Monday, December 10, 2012

Pausing for breath

The New Zealand First board will consider Brendan Horan's situation tonight, but no hasty decision is expected; the Herald reports:

Brendan Horan's position with the New Zealand First party is set to go before the organisation's hierarchy.
Allegations against Mr Horan, and his recent expulsion from the party's caucus, will be discussed by the New Zealand First board when it meets tonight.
Tonight's meeting is a scheduled one, not one specifically organised to discuss Mr Horan's status.
The party says it will be the first chance for the board to see the case Winston Peters has against his former colleague.
It is unlikely the meeting will result in Mr Horan's expulsion from the party, but it is expected to canvas how that process may proceed.

This is a sensible approach from the NZ First board, and contrasts with Winston Peters' hasty reaction last week. Peters alone summarily expelled Mr Horan from the NZ First caucus without giving his MP the opportunity to respond to the latest allegation that Mr Peters has received.

Given that he had already sent Mr Horan home on "gardening leave", did Winston Peters really need to expel Horan from the NZ First caucus based on information he received 45 minutes before making his decision in Parliament? We understand that politics and natural justice do not necessarily fit hand and glove, but it certainly seems to have been a very swift and emotional decision by the NZ First leader.

It will be interesting to hear how the NZ First board meeting tonight pans out. Their approach to Brendan Horan's membership on the NZF party is certainly more considered and less cavalier than Mr Peters' autocratic approach to Horan's caucus membership. 

2 comments:

Oliver Crom said...

"Did Winston Peters really need to expel Horan from the NZ First caucus based on information he received 45 minutes before making his decision in Parliament?"

Of course not!! he could have done a "John Key" and kept his errant Minister on, covering for him by saying that he "had no knowledge". That kind of deceit can work for months and months, as Mr Banks will attest. The public won't be able to do anything about it, aside from intensify their loathing, as they have done with Key. Peters applied far too much integrity to Horans' situation. He should have snaked it like Key.

On the far side of the hill said...

Another slow day in Riverton.
Yawn.