Thursday, June 13, 2013

Aaron Gilmore has a point

Former MP Aaron Gilmore has discovered blogging. And his most recent post poses a very good question; check this out:

So Trevor hassles me on being rude to a barman after a dinner after a lawyer alleges a whole lot more, but then Trevor threatens one of NZ’s most Senior Policeman’s job in front of a group in Parliament?
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/8786881/Drama-at-select-committee
So is Trevor going to be hounded out of Parliament by the media on this? Or is there one set of rules for some.

You have to admit that Gilmore has a point. Both the former MP and the current MP seemed to use their positions to "heavy" someone. Mr Mallard's infringement however is of more significance, given that it took place in a select committee room, in full public view.

Patrick Gower is now regarded as the ex-officio Leader of the Pack in the parliamentary press gallery. We look forward to the stakeouts of places likely to be inhabited by Mr Mallard, the tearful press conference and ultimately the resignation speech as the media applies the blowtorch to the veteran MP in the way that they did to the junior list MP, led by Mr Gower.

After all, sauce for the goose and all that...

 

3 comments:

bsprout said...

Gilmour was rude to a waiter because he was being egotistical and arrogant as well as being drunk.

Mallard (who I normally wouldn't defend because he was responsible for a disastrous Invercargill schooling review) was being blocked from questioning a potential Police Commissioner who had shown a severe and indefensible lack of judgement.

lofty said...

The watermelon apologist sure has a thin skin........a real watermelon normally has a very thick rind.

I know, lets have an inquisition into how and what people can abandon cannot say at the funeral of a colleague.

No no lets make it law.

bsprout said...

Sorry Lofty, you don't get it. This wasn't just anybody speaking at somebody's funeral, this was the Deputy Commissioner speaking on behalf of the police calling a corrupt cop "a police officer whose integrity was beyond reproach."